Archive for the ‘Funny Motivational Speaker’ Category

Will Your Corporate Entertainment Destroy Your Client or Employee Appreciation Event? 7 Ways to Stop That From Happening

Wednesday, July 18th, 2012 by bobgarner

Whether it’s an employee appreciation event, a customer appreciation event, or a sales meeting, choosing the wrong corporate entertainment can negate all the hard work you’ve done to create a great experience for your group. Here are a few things to keep in mind, when deciding on what type of corporate entertainment will work for you:

A Good Fit – The Audience:
While all people like to be entertained, there are differences of opinions as to what is entertaining. True, as the old saying goes, “The quickest way to fail is to try and please everyone,” you can still please the majority. To do that, look at your audience and determine what kind of entertainment they would actually pay to see. Consider the overall demographics of your group. For example: If you have an international group, a comedian may not be effective, unless that comedian knows how to work in front of that type of audience.

Stage, Lights and Sound – The Set-Up:
Make sure that your talent has the proper staging to deliver his or her act. If using a talent like a comedian or magician, keep the audience close to the stage. For these acts, placing the audience at a distance from the performer is an obstacle, as are any walls or building posts that may impede on views. Adequate sound and lighting that will meet the needs of your entertainment is critical. Finally, do not have your talent perform while your group is eating. That is distracting for the talent, as well as the audience.

This Ain’t HBO – Keep It Clean:
The corporate entertainer that you hire must be able to work clean. That means no offensive language, etc.

Show and Tell – View the Demo:
By viewing the corporate entertainer’s video, you will see whether or not he or she would be a fit for your group. Notice what other companies have hired that entertainer as their corporate event entertainment. Many entertainers will place logos on their sites “suggesting” they have worked for those companies, but they have no testimonials – written or video – to back up that work. The entertainer’s site should provide real testimonials – preferably video testimonials – and those testimonials should back up the majority of the companies for which the entertainer states he or she has worked.

Need to Speak – Conference Call:
Schedule a conference call with the act – not the agent. Unless you are hiring a “big name,” then you should be able to speak with the talent, prior to booking. Usually, the agent will also be on the call, which is fine. During that call, never talk about fees, just keep it to what you would like the talent to provide and gauge their response to your requests.

Don’t Forget Us – Customization:
The corporate entertainer should be able to customize his or her presentation to include some key messaging that you want your group to hear. Obviously, if you’re booking a band, that is not the case. I’m speaking about comedians, corporate magicians and mentalists, jugglers, etc. These talents should be able to incorporate some messaging into their presentations. For customer appreciation events the messaging may be lighter than for a sales group or maybe not. If the talent has corporate experience (and why would you hire that person if they didn’t?) during your conference call, ask their opinion.

The Check Is in the Mail – Pay on Time:
Most corporate event entertainment providers are self-employed. They require a deposit and then timely payment on the remainder. Don’t treat the talent like an employee or even a vendor that may supply product to your company. Your employees get paid on time – with benefits – and the vendors usually work with companies that pay them on time with benefits. You like to be paid on time… and so does the talent.

These are just a few corporate event entertainment ideas that will allow you to provide the right type of entertainment at your next event.  View my corporate entertainer site to find out what I provide or my corporate event entertainment site.

©2012 Bob Garner. All Rights Reserved. You may use this article, but you must use the byline and author resource.

Doing the Techno Thing

Wednesday, June 6th, 2012 by bobgarner

Just signed up for technorati. So, I have to post this code: AMP9TBSPGUDB.

There you go.

 

Leadership by Fear – Falling Off the Tiger

Tuesday, May 29th, 2012 by bobgarner

Winston Churchill once said, “Dictators ride to and fro upon tigers which they dare not dismount. And the tigers are getting hungry.” Though, Churchill was speaking of dictators of countries, the same statement can be applied to leaders of companies. Anyone in a leadership position who acts like a dictator – keeping their employees in fear – soon finds that once they start down that path of “fear” that the tiger will turn and eat them.

Leadership by fear rarely works in the long term. It may work in the short term, but eventually, the employees who feel they are being mistreated will begin to act out. While the bottom line may improve, employee morale sinks and key employees leave. Once employee morale sinks and employees leave, productivity and performance is soon to follow and then, ultimately, customer service.  Eventually, the loss of morale, performance and service will affect the bottom line and the fearful leader, who has become the despised leader, is eaten by the “tiger” that he created.

Leadership is not about pushing. It’s about pulling. By that I mean, an effective leader helps employees draw forth their skills and talents, as well as find new ones, and use them to not only improve the bottom line, but also themselves as people. This can never happen from leading by fear.

Fear makes employees recoil. It freezes them and stymies their productivity and performance. As mentioned, key employees will decide to leave and what is left are employees who acquiesce to the dictator and blandly follow the dictator, secretly waiting for the dictator to fall off the tiger.

The leader may subconsciously think, “They will do as I say. They are all afraid of me and losing their jobs.” True, the “left over” employees may be afraid of losing their jobs – after all, they have bills to pay; however, the reality is that the employees hate the leader. This feeling of hatred must be transferred to their jobs and, ultimately, to the customer. Eventually, this affects the bottom line and knocks the leader off his tiger.

True again, the leader may not care, because he/she will get a nice severance package. However, if you understand the psychology of executives, money is just a way of keeping score. The true test of a leader is whether or not they are still leading. If they just got a nice package and then are dismissed from the “club,” they are not leading, they are not leaders – and that hurts.

It was known that Churchill treated his staff, as well as others who worked with him, with respect and loyalty. In the book, “Action This Day: Working with Churchill,” by John Wheeler-Bennett, and subsequently quoted in “Churchill on Leadership” by Steven Hayward, are recollections from one of Churchill’s private secretaries, Sir Leslie Rowan who stated, “Churchill never let down his staff.” Additionally, wartime aide Lord Bridges wrote, “I cannot recollect a single Minister, serving officer or civil servant who was removed from office because he stood up to Churchill and told Churchill that his policy or proposals were wrong.”Haywardgoes even further stating that “Churchill never overruled the service chiefs of staff, even when he strenuously disagreed with their decisions.” 

Maybe that is why Churchill was – and still is – regarded as a great leader. People didn’t follow him because they were afraid of him; they did so because they respected him. Instead of riding a tiger, Churchill knew that it was far better to walk freely amongst those with whom he worked – asking for ideas and treating people with respect and loyalty. And even though, politically speaking, Churchill had his “ups and downs,” he never lost the respect of the British people or of the world. He never had to worry about falling off the tiger.

Recognized as a funny motivational speaker who actually has something to say, Bob Garner combines his skills as a corporate entertainer and an empowering speaker who talks on performance and productivity at the meetings and conferences of Fortune 1000 corporations, worldwide.

©2012 Bob Garner. All Rights Reserved. You may use this article, but you must use the byline and author resource.

Clients Confirm Funny Motivational Speaker Garner a Hit in New Video Testimonials

Tuesday, May 29th, 2012 by bobgarner

It’s been busy and the upcoming 8 weeks are jam packed. I finally got my latest funny motivational speaker video testimonials up.  Thank you to my clients.

As a corporate entertainer and funny keynote motivational speaker, I had the honor of speaking for this group at their meeting in Kansas. Here is what the president and the 1st VP had to say:

For this group, in addition to being the entertaining motivational speaker, I was also a trainer as I delivered information on how to increase their trade show ROI, as well as their sales in the field. Here is what the VP. of Marketing & Business Development had to say:

Again, thank you for the testimonials. These groups were fantastic!

Anger Management – Are You Quick to Anger or Have a Hard Time Controlling Your Anger?

Tuesday, May 29th, 2012 by bobgarner

I wrote this piece on dealing with anger for one of my other blogs. In this article, “John” experiences a few things that make him angry. You may recognize “John” in yourself or someone you know. If you are quick to anger or have a hard time controlling your anger, you may want to check it out. To read more, just click on the link.

Anger Management – Why Are You So Angry and How to Stop It

Imagine … John believes that he is an easy going and very pleasant fellow. Then one day, someone cuts him off in traffic and John now yells and screams at the other driver. At the stop light, John pulls up along side of the driver who cut him off and continues yelling at that driver. The other driver ignores John and, when the light turns green, simply drives away, while John sits there in his car… still yelling. 

As John drives on and “cools off,” he thinks about what happened and feels a sense of remorse and shame for his actions, yet he also feels justified – because the other driver should not have been so rude and cut him off. The incident will come back to haunt John’s consciousness throughout the day, delivering a variety of feelings at various times. John will wonder why he has a hard time controlling his anger. He subconsciously knows his behavior was in error and, eventually, will consciously admit it and vow to “act better” the next time. After all, he is a nice and pleasant person.

To read more, go here: Anger Management

 

Three New Client Testimonials for Funny Motivational Keynote Speaker and Corporate Entertainer Bob Garner

Tuesday, May 29th, 2012 by bobgarner

I recently had the pleasure of speaking for two groups and the clients filmed three testimonials. That is always appreciated. As a corporate entertainer and funny keynote speaker, I addressed this association in Kansas. Watch what they had to say:

 

 

 

 

At this event, in addition to being a funny meeting speaker, I put on my trainer hat and shared information on how this group could enhance their sales in the field, as well as at an upcoming trade show. Watch what this client had to say:

 

Anger Management – Why Are You So Angry and How to Stop It

Friday, May 11th, 2012 by bobgarner

Imagine… John believes that he is an easy-going and very pleasant fellow. Then one day, someone cuts him off in traffic and John now yells and screams at the other driver. At the stop light, John pulls up along side of the driver who cut him off and continues yelling at that driver. The other driver ignores John and, when the light turns green, simply drives away, while John sits there in his car… still yelling.

As John drives on and “cools off,” he thinks about what happened and feels a sense of remorse and shame for his actions, yet he also feels justified – because the other driver should not have been so rude and cut him off. The incident will come back to haunt John’s consciousness throughout the day, delivering a variety of feelings at various times. John subconsciously knows his behavior was in error and, eventually, will consciously admit it and vow to “act better” the next time. After all, he is a nice and pleasant person.

The very next day, John is sitting in a restaurant. There is a person standing next to his table speaking loudly on his cell phone. John glares angrily at this intruder and makes a few loud comments about “this rude person on the phone,” until the cell phone talker moves away. A few minutes later, John feels a sense of remorse and shame for acting in such a way, but feels justified – because that person should not have been speaking so loudly. As with the aforementioned driving incident, the cell phone encounter will haunt his consciousness and the anger game plays out the same way – ending in John’s vow to “act better” the next time. After all, John is a nice and pleasant person.

Actually, John is not a nice and pleasant person at all. He just thinks he is. John has an anger issue and a false sense of importance. After an incident occurs where John acts on his anger, he follows up that reaction with self-flagellation and false promises to not act that way again. This is a promise John will be unable to keep.

Why? Because John has created a false self-image of being a nice and pleasant person, when in reality he is not. He may even wonder, from time to time, as to why he gets angry and why he can’t control his anger. But he will never find an answer, because he is merely thinking about it and is not aware of that fact that he really is an angry person. His anger response is a knee-jerk or habitual response, which will continue in other situations – because John is not aware of his false self-image. Should he become aware of his false image, he will discover that his anger comes from within and not from the events on the outside. Should he choose not to become aware, he will repeat the same actions for the rest of his life.

True, the driver and the loud cell phone user were in error, but what about John’s reactions? In either event, an altercation could have happened, which could have escalated in a dangerous or drastic way. For John, these types of minor events will continue, and if John doesn’t change his reactions, he could, in the future, find himself in a very bad situation.

Again, John could “think” about why he is quick to anger, but it will change nothing, because thinking and awareness are two different things. Thinking is the job of the intellect; awareness is the job of spirit – it does nothing but watch and then slowly gives the answer, which is called awakening. 

To diminish his anger, John must first realize that the image he has of himself is false. He need not condemn himself – just accept the fact that he is quick to anger. Then when an angry moment approaches, he should not try to repress the anger, just watch it – as one would watch a bird fly by in the sky overhead. It’s that moment – that millisecond of silence when he is watching his anger go by – without judgment or condemnation – that he becomes aware of his feelings of anger. At that point, he is going beyond controlling anger or even anger management, he is “waking up” to his habitual feelings of anger. A simple recognition of the anger such as, “Wow, that makes me angry,” followed by, “That’s interesting,” delivers awareness. The very next millisecond will be a pause where there is no thought – just awareness.

This action allows John to stand apart from himself – to witness himself. He has created a space between the event and his emotions. Instead of his habitual response to circumstances that typically anger him, John is “waking up” to the fact that he does not have to allow his emotions (anger) to control him; he controls his emotions. John’s recognition of the space between his anger and the event allows for the weakening of the anger, which allows John to eventually break the chain of his past behavior. Most people do things and react to situations habitually, as if they were asleep. When you stop to view why you do the things you do and why you react to situations the way you do – you become “aware” and begin to “wake up.”

Now some might say this is akin to “counting to the number three,” before getting angry – but nothing could be further from the truth. Most people – when counting to three – do so with gritted teeth and a seething count-off. Therefore, they learn nothing about their true self and will continue to get angry over things that happen in their lives. However, by becoming aware of their true self and allowing anger to flow by without judgment or analysis, they open themselves up to a higher power, a spiritual power where their true self and understanding abide – a place of peace. Metaphorically speaking, in lieu of jumping into the raging tides of the ocean (emotions), you sit calmly on the shore (peace).

Should John repeat this “awareness” whenever a negative situation arises, it will deliver to him a new sense of consciousness about his true self – which is never bothered by the trivial actions of others. Eventually, he will notice that what used to make him angry no longer does. In fact, he will laugh at things that used to move him to anger. He will awaken to his true self, and, oddly enough, become the nice and pleasant person he thought he was… but now actually is.

Recognized as a funny motivational speaker who actually has something to say, Bob Garner combines his skills as a corporate entertainer and an empowering speaker who talks on performance and productivity at the meetings and conferences of Fortune 1000 corporations, worldwide.

Follow Bob on Twitter at @abundancefaucet. If you follow, Bob will followback. It’s a place to share tweets, as well as promote your books, ebooks, blogs and events on abundance, peace, spirit, health, happiness and more.

©2013 Bob Garner. All Rights Reserved. You may use this article, but you must use the byline and author resource.

Kindness: Give Me Flowers… While I’m Alive

Thursday, April 19th, 2012 by bobgarner

Have you ever noticed what happens at a funeral? Someone dies and everyone sends beautiful flowers and expressive cards. They show up at the funeral and say nice things about the departed. (To whom are they speaking?) 

Food for thought: If the departed could hear you, what do you think would be said about you? Maybe, “Wow … it would have been nice if you would have said that to me when I was alive.” or perhaps, “Look at all of these flowers! I didn’t know that all of you really cared.”

Think about the people with whom you interact with now. How often do you say thank you? How often do you stop what you are doing and say to someone “I love you”? How often do you practice “random acts of kindness” toward family and friends (and strangers)?

In the corporate world, when someone retires, they throw a party and people come up and say, “It was great working with you. You always did such a fantastic job.” Question: Did those same people ever say that to that person, while he or she was working at their job? Probably not.

What difference does it make that you think someone did a good job, when they are walking out the office door never to return again? What difference does it make when someone is dead that you thought he or she was a valued friend, if you never told them so when they were alive?

What about people you don’t know? What about hotel maids, front desk help, service reps? I have seen people order waiters around like they were indentured servants. When the waiter delivered what was asked, the recipient just ignored them.

Here’s another example: I was just at the airport and an airline employee went out of her way to help a passenger find the right gate. I mean the employee stopped what she was doing, walked this woman out to the monitors, showed her where her flight was located on the monitor, and then walked her in the right direction. The passenger didn’t even say thank you. She just kept walking. The airline employee stood there, shrugged her shoulders, and went back to doing what she was doing, prior to the passenger’s questions. Would it have killed that passenger to say “thank you”?

What we’re talking about is kindness. It’s about doing the “right thing.” As Martin Luther King Jr. once said, “The time is always right to do the right thing.” Why wait until your fellow employee is walking out the door for the last time to tell that person you enjoyed working with him? Why wait to tell an employee that she is doing a great job? Why wait to say thank you to someone who assists you … helps you … extends a kindly gesture? Why wait until a loved one dies, before you tell that person that you care about them?

The “right time” to do the “right thing” is right now. And don’t expect that your actions will always be reciprocated or rewarded, because – as in my airport example – most often they will not. However, you can’t wait for others to be kind; you have to show them how.

Mark Twain wrote, “Kindness is a language that the deaf can hear and the blind can see.” Doing the “right thing” is to speak the language of kindness to others, while they are in a position to receive it. Make a point today – and everyday – to give kindness to people while they are in our midst. Give them “flowers” … while they are alive.

Recognized as one of the leading funny keynote motivational speakers, this article is an adaptation from Bob Garner’s popular free motivational podcasts. Listen at Bob’s funny keynote motivational speaker site and click on “Podcasts” at the bottom of the page.

©2012 Bob Garner. All Rights Reserved. You may use this article, but you must use the byline and author resource.

KINDNESS: GIVE ME FLOWERS … WHILE I’M ALIVE

Monday, April 2nd, 2012 by bobgarner

Have you ever noticed what happens at a funeral? Someone dies and everyone sends beautiful flowers and expressive cards. They show up at the funeral and say nice things about the departed. (To whom are they speaking?) 

Food for thought: If the departed could hear you, what do you think would be said about you? Maybe, “Wow … it would have been nice if you would have said that to me when I was alive.” or perhaps, “Look at all of these flowers! I didn’t know that all of you really cared.”

Think about the people with whom you interact with now. How often do you say thank you? How often do you stop what you are doing and say to someone “I love you”? How often do you practice “random acts of kindness” toward family and friends (and strangers)?

In the corporate world, when someone retires, they throw a party and people come up and say, “It was great working with you. You always did such a fantastic job.” Question: Did those same people ever say that to that person, while he or she was working at their job? Probably not.

What difference does it make that you think someone did a good job, when they are walking out the office door never to return again? What difference does it make when someone is dead that you thought he or she was a valued friend, if you never told them so when they were alive?

What about people you don’t know? What about hotel maids, front desk help, service reps? I have seen people order waiters around like they were indentured servants. When the waiter delivered what was asked, the recipient just ignored them.

Here’s another example: I was just at the airport and an airline employee went out of her way to help a passenger find the right gate. I mean the employee stopped what she was doing, walked this woman out to the monitors, showed her where her flight was located on the monitor, and then walked her in the right direction. The passenger didn’t even say thank you. She just kept walking. The airline employee stood there, shrugged her shoulders, and went back to doing what she was doing, prior to the passenger’s questions. Would it have killed that passenger to say “thank you”?

What we’re talking about is kindness. It’s about doing the “right thing.” As Martin Luther King Jr. once said, “The time is always right to do the right thing.” Why wait until your fellow employee is walking out the door for the last time to tell that person you enjoyed working with him? Why wait to tell an employee that she is doing a great job? Why wait to say thank you to someone who assists you … helps you … extends a kindly gesture? Why wait until a loved one dies, before you tell that person that you care about them?

The “right time” to do the “right thing” is right now. And don’t expect that your actions will always be reciprocated or rewarded, because – as in my airport example – most often they will not. However, you can’t wait for others to be kind; you have to show them how.

Mark Twain wrote, “Kindness is a language that the deaf can hear and the blind can see.” Doing the “right thing” is to speak the language of kindness to others, while they are in a position to receive it. Make a point today – and everyday – to give kindness to people while they are in our midst. Give them “flowers” … while they are alive.

Recognized as one of the leading funny keynote motivational speakers, this article is an adaptation from Bob Garner’s popular free motivational audio podcast of the same title. To listen to this article for free, click on the above link now.

©2012 Bob Garner. All Rights Reserved. You may use this article, but you must use the byline and author resource.

Improving Communication – Arguing Over a Donkey and its Shadow

Friday, March 16th, 2012 by bobgarner

Aesop tells a story of a man who owned a donkey. He would offer a ride on his donkey to those who were looking to cross the hot desert. One day, a customer purchased this service and the customer, the man, and the donkey took off across the desert.

After a few hours, the customer who was riding on the donkey decided he wanted to take a break. So, the customer dismounted and, seeing that the donkey cast a nice shadow, sat down in the shade of the beast.

The owner of the donkey was not pleased at this, as he now had to sit in the blazing sun. The owner decided that he wanted the shade of the donkey. So, waiting until his customer fell asleep, the owner moved his donkey a few feet over and sat down in the shade of his donkey, which left his customer in the hot sun.

Sensing the heat that was now barreling down on him, the customer woke up and yelled, “How dare you. I paid for this donkey.” To which the owner replied, “You paid for the donkey, but not the shadow. If you want the shadow as well, you have to pay more.” The two men began to argue and the argument got so heated that the owner of the donkey slapped the customer. The customer slapped him back and they began to fight. The ruckus got so loud that the donkey became frightened and ran off leaving the man and the customer with no donkey and no shade. The two men sat in the burning sun and suffered – all because they were fighting over a shadow.

The art of communication and team building can be a tricky thing. When people argue, they lose track of the desired result. Personally, the cost can be the loss of or damage to a relationship. Professionally, the cost could be the loss of business or a damaged working environment. In either case, during an argument, many people end up fighting over the shadows of their own opinions, agendas, and emotions – instead of looking at a situation logically or listening to the other person’s side of an issue.

What always needs to be kept in mind is the end result. To improve your communicative skills – as well as your teamwork and your productivity skills – the next time an issue arises that could lead to an argument, strive to keep in mind the desired end result. Quietly listen to the other person’s viewpoint and try to refrain from pushing your opinion or agenda. See if you can compromise with the other person.

If it looks like you have come to a complete impasse, then follow the old dictum, “When in doubt, write it out.” Write down the desired goal and then each person’s ideas or views. Discuss these options and write down the “pros” and “cons” of each. Sometimes when you have it “all down on paper,” the proper option to take to achieve the end goal just pops out at you.

Of course, this only works if each person gives up the childish need to “save face” or “always have it their way.” It’s humorous to think we will stop children from acting this way but, as adults, many do the same thing.

Our desert friends acted childishly, and if they would have stayed focused on the desired end result – getting across the desert – sharing the shadow of the donkey would have just come naturally. Keep the shadows of your emotions and opinions in the background and focus on working together to achieve the desired result.

Recognized as a funny motivational speaker who actually has something to say, Bob Garner works with corporations worldwide to improve employee and sales productivity and performance. This article is available in audio format. Click on this link to listen or download this free motivational podcast, at Bob’s free podcast site.

©2012 Bob Garner. All Rights Reserved. You may use this article, but you must use the byline and author resource.